30/12/2017

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Welcome ! Willkommen !

This is an index of all the persons introduced in the Darumapedia.

. Daruma Pilgrims Gallery .


. Personal names used in Haiku 俳句  .

. WKD : Introducing Japanese Haiku Poets .

. WKD : 松尾芭蕉 Matsuo Basho and his friends .

. WKD SAIJIKI : Memorial Days of Famous People .


and many more

. - - - PERSONS - ABC-LIST of this BLOG - - - .



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Gabi Greve
June 2013


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02/08/2016

Keichu Priest

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Keichuu, Keichū 契沖 阿闍梨 Keichu Ajari
(1640 - 1701)

- quote -
a Buddhist priest and a scholar of Kokugaku in the mid Edo period. Keichū’s grandfather was a personal retainer of Kato Kiyomasa but his father was a rōnin from the Amagasaki fief. When he was 13, Keichū left home to become an acolyte of the Shingon sect, studying at Kaijō in Myōhōji, Imasato, Osaka. He subsequently attained the post of Ajari (or Azari) at Mount Kōya, and then became chief priest at Mandara-in in Ikutama, Osaka. It was at this time that he became friends with the poet-scholar Shimonokōbe Chōryū (下河辺長流:1624 – 1686).



However, he disliked the worldly duties of his work and, after wandering around the Kinki region for a while, made his way back to Mount Kōya. Deeply influenced by the thinking of Kūkai, he also read widely in the Japanese classics under the patronage of Fuseya Shigeta (伏屋重賢), a patron of the arts in Izumi Province. After serving as chief priest at Myōhōji, Keichū spent his last years at Enju’an in Kōzu in the Province of Settsu.

His prolific works set a new standard in the study of the classics, though building on recent revivals of interest in the subject. When the daimyo of Mito, Tokugawa Mitsukuni, decided to sponsor an edition of the Man'yōshū, he commissioned Shimonokōbe Chōryū, heir to the learning of the great poet and Man’yō expert Kinoshita Chōshōshi (木下長嘯子:1569 – 1649), to undertake the project. However his dilatory approach, combined with illness, and finally death, impeded his work and the task fell to Keichū, a close friend.
The result was the latter’s Man’yō Daishōki (万葉集大匠記:1687-1690), which had a profound effect on kokugaku scholarship.


Manyo Daisho-Ki 万葉集代匠記 / 萬葉代匠記

Similarly his Waji Seiranshō   和字正濫鈔 (1693: A Treatise on the Proper way to Write Japanese Words) challenged the standard orthographical conventions set by Fujiwara Teika and reconstructed distinctions in the old Japanese lexicon based on the earliest texts. In addition to these Keichū wrote the
Kōganshō  厚顔抄 1691 A Brazen-faced Treatise, the Kokin Yozaishō, the Seigodan, the Genchū Shūi, and the Hyakunin Isshu Kaikanshō.
- source : wikipedia

kokugaku 国学 Japanese studies

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Keichū
a commentary to the Nara-period poetry collection Man’yōshū (Collection of Ten Thousand Leaves, mid-8th c.).
Keichū’s aim in writing this work was to reconstruct as closely as possible the original meaning of the text by looking at a wide range of contemporary and near-contemporary sources. Within the work, Keichū discusses the basic principles of his approach to the study of the past, which can be summarized as follows:

Reconstruct the contemporary meaning of the work and avoid at all costs any interference from the modern reader’s expectations and beliefs.
Make use only of sources from the same time period or thereabouts.
Do not take for granted the theories contained in later commentaries, including traditionally authoritative ones, because they may not be accurate or not apply directly to the age of the Man’yōshū.

Keichū applied these principles not only to the Man’yōshū, but also to the Kokinshū and other important works of the past. Through his method he made a number of important breakthroughs that forever changed the face of scholarship on the classics.

Although Keichū’s method may seem obvious today, no one before him had used such a rigorous philological approach in waka studies. Traditionally, waka scholars studied under a master and the emphasis was on amassing the transmitted teachings of one’s school or “house” (ie) rather than on textual study. Keichū never studied under a specific master, and so was never bound by a master-disciple type of relationship. Even more important was the boom of book publishing, which enabled Keichū to obtain the texts he needed for his research with ease.

As sources for his commentary to the Man’yōshū, Keichū names the Nihon shoki (Chronicles of Japan, 720), the Kaifūsō (Collection of Fond Recollections, 751), the Shoku Nihongi (Later Chronicles of Japan, 797), the Kogo shūi (Gleanings of Ancient Words, 807), the Shinsen Man’yōshū (Newly Edited Man’yōshū, 894), and the Wamyō ruijūshō (Japanese Words by Category, ca. 938), all of which were written between the 8th and 10th centuries, and all of which were available in print when Keichū wrote Man’yō daishōki in 1683.
None of them had ever been printed prior to the late 17th century, so it can be said that Keichū’s text-based scholarship would have been impossible in earlier periods. That Keichū’s approach relied heavily on printed editions of the texts he studied can be seen from the many notes and comments that he personally wrote on his own printed editions of the classics. Keio University Library owns one such book (Fig.2).
- source : futurelearn.com/courses - Keio university -


. Man'yōshū 万葉集 / 萬葉集 Manyoshu Poetry Collection .
Manyoo-Shuu, Manyo-Shu, Manyoo'shuu, Manyōshyū
"Collection of Ten Thousand Leaves"

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Keichuuki, Keichuu Ki 契沖忌 Memorial Day for Keichu
契沖の忌日 / 正月二十五日 / 25th day of the first lunar month
- kigo for the New Year, late Winter or Spring -

一扇の軸を上座に契沖忌
issen no jiku o jooza ni Keishuu Ki

a scroll
of one fan on the seat of honor -
Keichu Memorial Day


. Iida Dakotsu 飯田蛇笏 .





. Memorial Days of Famous People - Saijiki .

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- reference : 契沖 -


. Famous Buddhist Priests - ABC-List .

- - - #keichu #manyoshu - - -
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31/07/2016

Chiyo no Fuji

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Chiyo no Fuji 千代の富士 Chiyonofuji
Kokonoe Oyakata 九重親方

(June 1, 1955 – July 31, 2016)



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Chiyonofuji Mitsugu 千代の富士 貢
Mitsugu Akimoto (秋元 貢 Akimoto Mitsugu), was a Japanese champion sumo wrestler and the 58th yokozuna of the sport. He was the stable master of Kokonoe stable.

Chiyonofuji was one of the greatest yokozuna of recent times, winning 31 yusho or tournament championships, second at the time only to Taihō. He was particularly remarkable for his longevity in sumo's top rank, which he held for a period of ten years from 1981 to 1991. Promoted at the age of twenty-six after winning his second championship, he seemed only to improve with age and won more tournaments in his thirties than any other wrestler, finally retiring in May 1991 just short of his thirty-sixth birthday. This is in contrast to most recent yokozuna who have tended to retire around 30.

During his 21-year professional career Chiyonofuji set records for most career victories (1045) and most wins in the top makuuchi division (807). This caused him to be listed by Guinness World Records Both of these records were later broken by Kaiō Hiroyuki.

He won the Kyushu tournament, one of the six annual honbasho, a record eight consecutive years from 1981 until 1988, and also set the record for the longest postwar run of consecutive wins (53 bouts in 1988). That record stood for 22 years until Hakuhō broke it with his 54th straight win in September 2010.

In a sport where weight is often regarded as vital, Chiyonofuji was quite light at around 120 kg (260 lb). He relied on superior technique and muscle to defeat opponents. He was the lightest yokozuna since Tochinoumi in the 1960s. Upon his retirement he became an elder of the Japan Sumo Association under the name
Kokonoe Oyakata 九重親方.

Kokonoe underwent surgery for pancreatic cancer in July of 2015, and was noticeably weak when speaking to reporters at the Aki basho in September of that year. Having reportedly told associates that the cancer had spread to his heart and lungs, he had been hospitalized since the fourth day of the Nagoya tournament in 2016.
He died in Tokyo on July 31, 2016 at the age of 61.
© More in the WIKIPEDIA !




Chiyo no Fuji
the long-time hero of all
Chiyo no Fuji



. Sumo wrestling 相撲 .
sumo wrestler, sumotoori 相撲取(すもうとり)


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His Kanreki dohyō-iri. One of only 10 performed ever.

九重親方(第58代横綱) - 還暦土俵入り!
- source : youtube.com -

- Reference - 千代の富士 -
- Reference - chiyo no fuji-

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30/07/2016

Buddhist Priests List

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Famous Buddhist Priests - ABC-List


日本の名僧・高僧 88人


doogoo 道号 "Name of the Way" after a person entered priesthood


Some priests have their name as a kigo for Haiku.
. Introducing Japanese Haiku Poets and People .

Many of them already have their own page and are mentioned in boldface.
Check the ABC-List of this BLOG.
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Abutsu ni 阿仏尼 あぶつに Nun Abutsu-Ni (? - 1283)

Ankokuji Ekei 安国寺恵瓊 (1539 – 1600)


Baisan Monpon 梅山聞本 (?- 1417)

Bankei Yōtaku 盤珪永琢 Yotaku (1622 - 1693)

Banna 鑁阿 (ばんな) (1144 - 1199) (262)

Benkei, Musashibō Benkei 武蔵坊弁慶 Musashibo Benkei (1155–1189)


Chōgen, Choogen 重源 (1121 - 1206), Chogen, also known as Shunjōbō Chōgen 俊乗坊重源

Doogen 道元 Dogen Zenji (1200 - 1253)

Dookyoo 道鏡 Dokyo (? - 772)

Dooshoo 道昭 Dosho (629 - 700)


Eji 恵慈 えじ Eji (?~623?), Korean: Hyeja  
He was a tutor of Buddhism to Shōtoku Taishi.

Eikan 永観 Eikan (1032 - 1111)

Eisai (Yoosai) 栄西 Eisai 1141 - 1215)

Eizan Shookin 瑩山紹瑾 Eizan Shokin (1268 - 1325)

Eizon 叡尊 Eizon (1201 - 1290)

Enchin 円珍 / 圓珍 Enchin (814 - 891)

Enkan 円観  Enkan (1281 - 1356)

Enkuu, Enkū 円空 Enku (1632 – 1695)

Enni 円爾 Enni (1202 - 1280)

Ennin 円仁 Ennin Jigaku Daishi 慈覚大師 (794 - 864)

En no Ozune, Gyōja 役小角 En no Gyoja (634 - 706)

Ensai 円載 Ensai (? - 877)

Eshin Ni 恵信尼 Nun Eshin-Ni (1182 - ?1268)


Fukuda Gyookai 福田行誡 Fukuda Gyokai (1806 - 1888) (366)


Ganjin 鑑真 Ganjin / Jianzhen (688 - 763) Chinese monk

Gasan Jōseki, Jooseki 峨山韶碩 Gasan Joseki (1275 – 23 November 1366)

Genboo 玄肪 Genbo (? - 746)

Genshin 源信 Genshin (942 - 1017) (124)

Gesshoo 月照 Gessho (1813 - 1858) (354)

Getsushoo 月性 Getsusho (1817 - 1858) (352)

Gidoo Shuushin 義堂周信 Gido Shushin(1325 - 1388)

Gien 義淵(ぎえん) (? - 728)

Gudō Toshoku, Gudoo 愚堂東寔 Gudo Toshoku (1577 – 1661)

Gyooki 行基 Gyoki Bosatsu (668 - 749)

Gyooson, Gyōson 行尊 Gyoson (1057 - 1135) (136)


Hakuin Zenji 白隠禅師 Hakuin Ekaku (1686 - 1768)

Henjoo 遍昭 Henjo (816 - 890)

Hoonen 法然 Honen (1133 - 1212)

Hōzōin In'ei, Hoozoo-in 宝蔵院胤栄 Hozoin In-Ei (1521 – October 16, 1607)


Ikkyuu Soojun 一休宗純 Ikkyu Sojun (1394 - 1481)

Ingen 隠元 Eisai Zenji 栄西禅師 (1141 - 1215)

Ippen 一遍 Ippen (1239 - 1289)

Issan Ichinei 一山一寧  Issan(1247 - 1317)

Isshi Monju 一糸文守 Monju (1608 - 1646)


Jakuren 寂蓮 Jakuren (1139 - 1202)

Jakushin 寂心 Jakushin (? - 1001) (120)

Jien 慈円  Jien (1155 - 1225)

Jitchū, Jitchuu 実忠 Jitchu (? - 824)

Jiun 慈雲 Jiun (1718 - 1804)

Junjoo 俊ジョウ(草冠にイ乃) (1166 - 1227)

Juubin 守敏 Jubin (? around 800)

Juugen 重源 Jugen (1121 - 1206) - see Choogen


Kaisen Jooki 快川紹喜 Kaisen Joki (? - 1582) (268)

Kakuban 覚鑁 Kakuban (1095 - 1143)

Kakunyo 覚如 Kakunyo (1270 - 1351)

Kakushin Ni 覚信尼 Nun Kakushin Ni (1224 - 1283)

Kakuyuu 覚猷 Kakuyu (1053 - 1140) (鳥羽僧正 Toba Sojo)

Kangan Giin 寒巌義尹 Kangan (1217–1300)

Kanjoo 寛朝 Kanjo (?916 - 998)

Kawaguchi Chiekai 河口慧海 Kawaguchi Chiekai (1866 - 1945) (370)

Keichuu 契沖 阿闍梨 Keichu Ajari (1640 - 1701)

Kanzan Egen 開山慧玄 Kanzan(1277 - 1360)

Kenkai 兼海 Kenkai (1107 - 11 June 1155)

Kennyo 顕如 Kennyo (1543 - 1592) (276)

Kinkoku Shoonin 金谷上人 Saint Kinkoku Shonin (1761 - 1832) (316)

Kokan Shiren 虎関師錬 Kokan(1278 - 1346)

Kookei, Koogei, Kōkei 皇慶 Kokei (?977 – 1049)

Kooen 皇円 Koen (? - ?1169) 肥後阿闍梨 - Higo Ajari

Koogon 光厳法皇 Kogon Ho-O(1313 - 1364)

Kōsai, Koosai 幸西 Kosai (1163 – May 20, 1247)

Koun Ejō 孤雲懐奘 Ko-Un (1198 - 1280)

Kuukai 空海 弘法大師 Kukai Kobo Daishi (774 - 835)

Kuuya 空也 Saint Kuya (903 - 972)

Kyoonyo 教如 Kyonyo (1558 - 1614)


Mansai 満済 Mansai (1378 - 1435) (246)

Minchuu 明兆 Minchu (1351 - 1431) 

Mokujiki 木喰五行 Mokujiki Gogyo (1718 - 1810)

Mokujiki Oogo 木食応其 Mokujiki Ogo (1536 - 1608)

Mokujiki Tanshoo 木喰但唱 Mokujiki Tansho (? - 1641)

Mongaku 文覚 Mongaku (?1193 - ?1205)

Monkan 文観  Monkan (1278 - 1357)

Mugaku Sogen 無学祖元 Mugaku, Wuxue Zuyuan (1226 - 1286)

Mujū Dōkyō, Mujuu Dookyoo 無住道曉 Muji Dokyo (1 January 1227 - 9 November 1312)

Musoo Soseki 無窓疎石 Muso Soseki (1275 - 1351)

Myooe, Myōe 明恵 Myoe, Myo-E (1173 - 1232)


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. boozu 坊主 priest, お坊さん O-Bo-San .

oshoo 和尚 priest
nyuudoo 入道 Nyudo priest
shoonin, shônin 上人 saint, head priest of a temple
daitoko 大徳(だいとこ)daitoku だいとく priest of high standard
soojoo. sôjô 僧正 high-ranking priest, "archbishop"
meisoo 名僧 famous priest / monk
koosoo 高僧 high-ranking priest



Photo by Tamamura Kōzaburō (1856 - 1923)

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- - - many priests with names starting with NICHI belong to the Nichiren sect - - -

Nichigen, Buzen Nichigen 豊前日源 (?1263 – 1315)

Nichiji 日持 (Kaiko) (February 10, 1250 – ?1304)

Nichijin 日陣 Nichijin (May 30, 1339 - June 14, 1419)

Nichiken, Awaji Nichiken(淡路日賢 (1243–1338)

Nichimoku 日目 Nichimoku (1260 – 1333)

Nichiō, Nichioo 日奥 Nichio, NichiO (1565 – 1630)

Nichiren 日蓮 Saint Nichiren (1222 - 1282)

Nichiroo, Nichirō 日朗 Nichiro (1243 - 1320)

Nichizoo, Nichizō 日像 Nichizo(1269 - 1342)

Nikkō, Nikkoo 日興 Nikko (1246 –1333)

Nikoo, Minbu Nikō 民部日向 Mibu Niko (1253 - 1314)

Ninshoo 忍性 Ninsho (1217 - 1303)

Nisshin 日親 Nisshin(1407 - 1488)

Nisshō, Nisshoo 日昭 Nissho, (?1221 – 1323)

Nitchō, Nitchoo 日頂 Nitcho (1252 – April 19, 1317)

Nomura Moto Ni 野村望東尼 Nun Nomura Motoni (1806 - 1867) (350)

Noonin, Dainichibō Nōnin 大日房能忍 Nonin ( ? 1190)

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Ootagaki Rengetsu, Ōtagak 太田垣蓮月 Nun Otagaki Rengetsu (1791 - 1875)

Ootani Kooen Kubutsu 大谷光演 / 大谷句仏 Otani Koen (1875 - 1943)

Raigoo 頼豪 Raigo (1002 - 1084)

Rankei Dooryuu 蘭渓道隆 Rankei Doryu (1213 - 1278)

Rennyo 蓮如 Rennyo (1415 - 1499)

Rensei / Renshoo 蓮生 れんせい・れんじょう  Rensho / Renjo (1141 - 1208)

Rooben, Rōben 良弁  Roben (689 - 773)

Ryoogen 良源  Ryogen (912 - 985) (116)

Ryookan 良寛 Ryokan, Taigu 大愚 (1758 - 1831)

Ryoonin 良忍  Ryonin (1073 - 1132)

Ryuukoo 隆光 Ryuko (1649 - 1724)


Saichoo, Saichō 最澄 伝教大師 Saicho Dengyo Daishi (767 - 822)

Saigyoo Hooshi 西行法師 Saigyo Hoshi (1118 - 1190)

Sakuden 策伝 Sakuden (1554 - 1641)

Sengai 仙厓義梵 Sengai Gibon (175 1– 1837)

Sengaku 仙覚 Sengaku (?1203 - 1273)

Sesson Shuukei 雪村周継 Sesson (1504 - 1589)

Sesshuu 雪舟等楊 Sesshu Toyo (1420 - 1506)

Setouchi Jakuchō, Jakuchoo 瀬戸内寂聴 Nun Setouchi Jakucho (May 15, 1922 - )

Shimaji Mokurai 島地黙雷 Shimaji (1838 - 1911) (368)

Shinnyo 真如  Shinnyo 親王 (799 - 865) (132)

Shinran 親鸞  Shinran (1173 - 1262)

Shinshō, Shinshoo 真紹 Shinsho (797 – 873)

Shooboo 聖宝 Shobo (832 - 909)

Shoodoo 勝道 Shodo (735 - 817)

Shōkū, Shookuu 証空 Shoku (1177 - 1247), Seizan 西山

Shunkan 俊寛 Shunkan (c. 1143 – 1179)

Shunoku myooha 春屋妙葩 Shunoku Myoha(1311 - 1388)

- - soohei, sōhei 僧兵 Sohei, lit. "monk warriors", fighting monks

Suuden, Konchi-In Suuden 金地院崇伝 / Ishin Sūden 以心崇伝 Suden (1569 - 1633)

Suzuki Shosan 鈴木正三 Shosan (1579 - 1655) (288)

Suzuki Shunryū, Shunryuu 鈴木俊隆 Suzuki Shunryu (1904 - 1971) Zen


Taichō, Taichoo 泰澄 Taicho (July 20, 682 – April 20, 767)

Taigen Suufu 太原崇孚, 太原雪斎 Taigen Sessai (1469 - 1555) (266)

Taihan 泰範 (?817 ) disciple of Kukai (96)

Takeda Motsugai 武田物外 Takeda Motsugai (1795 - 1867)

Takuan, Takuan Sōhō 沢庵宗彭 Takuan Soho (1573 – 1645)

Tenkai 天海 Tenkai (1536 – 1643) / Nankōbō Tenkai 南光坊天海

Tettsū Gikai, Tettsu 徹通義介 Tetsu Gikai (1219 - 1309)

Tokuitsu 徳一 Tokuichi, Toku-Itsu (781? - 842?)


Uda Hoo-oo 宇多法皇 Uda Ho-O (879 - 931)


Yasutani Hakuun 安谷白雲 Yasutani Haku-Un (1885 - 1973) Kamakura Zendo

Yootaku, Bankei Yōtaku 盤珪永琢 Yotaku (1622 - 1693)

Yuien 唯円 Yuien,Yui-En (1222 - 1289) 

Yuukai 宥快 Yukai (1345 - 1416)

Yuuten 祐天 Yuten (1637 - 1718)


Zekkai Chuushin 絶海中津 Sekkai Chushin(1336 - 1405)

Zenjin ni 善信尼 Nun Zenjin-Ni (? sixth century)

Zenran 善鸞 Zenran (1217 - 1286)

Zooga、Sooga 増賀 Zoga, Soga (917 - 1003) (122)

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知っておきたい日本の名僧 / 瓜生中 Uryu Naka



日本名僧列伝 / 柏原祐泉 (編集), 薗田香融 (編集)



事典 日本の名僧 / 今泉淑夫 (編集)
180人の僧を没年順に収載した



名僧でたどる日本の仏教 / 末木文美士



名僧 100人
- reference : ne.jp/asahi/kiwameru/kyo -


more books about 日本の名僧 - 16 pages
日本名僧辞典 1976
日本をつくった名僧一〇〇人
日本の名僧入門―日本人の心を創りあげた二十人の素顔と生きざま
- source : www.amazon.co.jp -

List with books about the priests
- reference : yoshikawa-k.co.jp-


"Japanese Buddhist monks" - ABC-list
- - - More in the WIKIPEDIA !

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20/07/2016

Kamada Matahachi Kamata

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Kamada Matahachi (Kamata Matahachi) 鎌田又八
(? 1657)

A fictional figure. Taken up in Kabuki.
梅鎌田大力巷説 Ume Kamata Daikikibanashi

There was a feud in a local samurai family of Iga (Mari) no Kanemitsu, who was having an affair with his brother's widow. The loyal retainer, Matahachi and the mistress of the Lord, 菊野 Kikuno, have to take the blame for it all.
They are set up as adulterers by 毬埜兼満 Mari no Kanemitsu and murdered for that crime by putting them in a basket, bound firmly back to back, and thrown in a river to drown.
But later the nun 経題尼 Kyodai-Ni tells the true story to rehabilitate them.

Matahachi was known as a strong man killing various Yokai monsters.

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source : museums.fivecolleges.edu/detai
Katsushika Hokusa 葛飾北斎

Kamada Matahachi Chikara [Kamada Matahachi (has) strength]
鎌田又八ちから
from the book Ehon Wakan Homare [Picture Book of Noted Japanese and Chinese (Heroes)]

A vertical print of a half-naked man sitting on the floor with a box to his right and a pipe container and a small box to his left. Grabing his left leg with his left hand and smoking a kiseru pipe, he inserts a brush in his sandal and uses it to write inscriptions to the left. The expert brushman, Kamata Matahachi, demonstrates his deftness with the brush. He is seated smoking a kiseru pipe, a brush is inserted in his sandal.

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Here Matahachi is shown killing a monstrous nekomata cat in the mountains of Ise Province.

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Utagawa Kuniyoshi 歌川邦芳

Kamada Matahachi of Matsuzaka fighting off wolves with a huge iron bar in the Ashigara Mountains of Izu

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Sadashige aratame Kuniteru 貞重改国輝

The immensely strong man Kamata Matahachi lifts up a huge temple pillar to put his sandal under it, in order to demonstrate his strength. A flock of disturbed pigeons fly up in front of the temple altar.
This scene happened in Karuizawa.

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source : artic.edu/aic/collections/artwork
Torii Kiyonobu I 鳥居清信

The Actors 市川団十郎 Ichikawa Danjuro II as Kamada Matahachi and
市川門之助 Ichikawa Monnosuke I as 久松 Hisamatsu
in the play "Osome Hisamatsu Shinju Tamoto no Shirashibori,"
performed at the Morita Theater, 1720, 1720

Osome Hisamatsu tamoto no chirachibori (Story of Osome and Hisamatsu, 1711)
A play written by Ki no Kaion.

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Utagawa KUNISADA

- quote -
The ghost of Kamata Matahachi
This print represents a scene from the kabuki play True record of the famous song for hand-balls, which was performed in the Nakamura Theatre in the seventh month of 1855.

The tragedy of the play concerns the Mari family. Mari Yashiro made love to his brother's widow, who had become a nun after her husband's death. When his wrong-doing came to be known to his servant Kamata Matahachi and his dead brother's concubine Kikuno, Yashiro had them both killed.

In this print, Kamata Matahachi and Kikuno appear as ghosts tied facing in opposite directions, accompanied by their spirit fires. Both are identified by the inscriptions in the cartouches.
The print is signed 'Toyokuni', the name of his teacher who Kunisada had adopted in 1844.
- source : ngv.vic.gov.au/ngvschools -

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source : ukiyo-e.org/image/mfa/sc

Actors Ichikawa Kodanji IV as Marino Kanemitsu (R),
Ichikawa Kodanji IV as Ghost of Kamada Matahachi (Kamada Matahachi bôrei) and
Ghost of Kikuno (Kikuno ga bôrei) (C),
Iwai Kumesaburô III as the Nun Kyôdai (L)




- quote -
OSOME NO NANAYAKU - "Osome's seven roles"
Osome Hisamatsu Ukina no Yomiuri

Act I, scene 1: within the precincts of the Myôken Shrine in Yanagishima
Act I, scene 2: the zashiki of the Hashimotoya
Act I, scene 3: the Koume Tobacco Shop
Act II, scene 1: at the Aburaya in Kawara-machi
Act II, scene 2: on the 2nd floor behind the Aburaya in Kawara-machi
Act III, scene 1: the michiyuki at Mukôjima
- Read the full text here:
- source : kabuki21.com/osome_no_nanayaku-

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. yookai, yōkai 妖怪 Yokai monsters .

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- reference - 鎌田又八 -
- reference : 梅鎌田大力巷説 -
- Reference - kamada matahachi -
- reference - kamata matahachi -

. Join the Ukiyo-E friends on facebook ! .




- - - #kamadamatahachi #kikuno - - -
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22/06/2016

Daidozan Bungoro Sumo

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Daidoozan Bungoroo, Daidôzan Bungorô 大童山文五郎 Daidozan Bungoro
(1788 - 1822)

. WKD : sumoo 相撲 Sumo wrestling .
- Introduction -


source : ameblo.jp/giantlimited/entry

碁盤上げ Goban age
写楽 Sharaku

A young Sumo wrestler, Bungoro, is using a wooden Go board to fan out the candle.
This was a new amusement for the people of Edo.

. wa roosoku 和蝋燭 Japanese candles .

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- quote -
The Great Child Mountain
Daidozan Bungoro, the Great Child Mountain, who at the age of seven stood a fairly modest 3'10", but weighed a staggering 183 pounds, was a popular figure in 1795. Wrestling fans enjoyed Daidozan’s performances. To the excitement of the fans, the ‘Yobidashi’, announcer, would sing a delightful chant calling Daidozan into the ring. Daidozan would perform his ceremonial ritual. Then the ‘Gyoji’, referee, would signal Daidozan to begin. The little butterball would perform all of the Sumo wrestler methods of ‘tuki’, thrusting, ‘yori’, clinching, and ‘oshi’, pushing. After the exhibition, his fame would spread into other areas of Japanese culture.
An example, is a woodblock print showing Daidozan drinking sake and being offered tea by the famous beauty and teahouse waitress Okita of the Naniwaya and biscuits by her rival Ohisa of the Takashimaya.


This stamp is the fifth of 5 single issues that commemorates Sumo champions.
The fifth single-issue stamp commemorates the Daidozan, Great Child Mountain, in Ring-entry Ceremony.

Daidozan was not the only child prodigy to appear as a Sumo wrestler. Among his successors were the seven year old, Jintsuriki, weighing 174 pounds. In 1836, an eight year-old called Oniwaka who weighed in at 156 pounds. In 1859, Maizuru Komakichi, at the age of eight, who displayed his 218 pound frame to the wrestling fans at the Eko-in. Wrestling fans have enjoyed these performances. In addition, the exhibitions of adult wrestler giants were frequently done side by side with the child prodigy for the enjoyment of the fans. This presentation would reveal the uniqueness of the body of both wrestlers. The adult wrestlers who appeared with these prodigies were also prized above all for their size. These wrestlers would give a collectible artifact of a hand-print, impressed in either ink or cinnabar, to their admirers. These desirable artifacts, given to the admirers, are used as comparisons of the span that their puny hands have over the massive ones of the adult and prodigy wrestler.

In woodblock prints, both child and adult wrestlers were treated quite differently from other subjects, and always in a way to accentuate their size. What the wrestler prints displayed was the bulk and phenomenal strength. These qualities emerge most clearly in portraits of individual wrestlers with rippling muscles exaggerated to the point of caricature. In other prints, they are seen to be associated with the delicate fragility of the geisha and the cherry blossom.

Since these prints were all designed for commercial profit, it seems reasonable to assume that in emphasizing their size, the designers were giving the public precisely what it wanted. This is why the wrestlers could spend unlimited time for their stately warmingup exercises. It also explains why a whole day could be spent on ceremonies in which they displayed themselves. Again, giving to the public precisely what it wanted. This is not to say that the wrestling bout was not as desired by the public, but that both are equally important.

- - - - - A Synopsis of the Artist
... Saito Jurobei, pseudonym Toshusai Sharaku....
- source : Do You Know This Stamp.com, Inc -

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- quote
Daidozan Bungoro
Highest Rank - - Maegashira 5
Real Name - - BUNGORO Shiono
Birth Date - - February 15, 1788
Shusshin - - Yamagata-ken, Higashine-shi
Death Date - - December 20, 1822 (34 years)
Height and Weight - - 159 cm 169 kg
Heya - - Isenoumi
Shikona - - Daidozan Bungoro
Hatsu Dohyo - - 1794.11 (Maegashira)
Intai - Retirement - - 1813.01
- source : sumodb.sumogames.de/Rikishi -

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Sumô Wrestlers Tanikaze and Daidôzan Bungorô


Utagawa Toyokuni I

Lifting a money box
. Senryobako 千両箱 money box .

Daidôzan Bungorô, Boy Wrestler, Age Seven
Katsukawa Shun'ei

Wrestlers and Umpires Contemplating the Child Wonder Daidozan Bungoro
Toshusai Sharaku

- More ukiyo-e prints of Bungoro 浮世絵
- reference : ukiyo-e.org/search -

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- Reference - 大童山文五郎 -
- Reference - Daidozan Bungoro -

. Welcome to Edo 江戸 ! .

- - - #daidozanbungoro #bungorosumo - - -
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28/05/2016

Poets about Japan

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Poets about Japan


- source with hyperlinks : themargins.net/anth/19thc -

edited by Irene De Angelis

Terms of Use:
Materials in Emerging from Absence: An Archive of Japan in English-Language Verse are made accessible for non-profit educational and research purposes only.
Themargins.net makes no warranty with regard to their use for any other purpose.


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- - - - - Acknowledgments
My first debt in bringing together this archive is to those who have granted permission to include work in it, who without payment beyond a notice of titles in print have so generously supported the project. I am indebted also to those who have called my attention to work that has found its way here, particularly to Paul Rossiter, who has filled in many gaps in my knowledge, and to the late Richard Caddel, who after one accidental meeting and one following e-mail posted queries, forwarded responses, and brought me up to date.

The archive also has benefited from the various kindnesses of Emiko Kuroda, Peter Makin, the late Shigeo Tobita, and Scott Watson, and would not have been possible without the courtesy of the Department of English and the excellence of the staff of the University Library at Indiana University, Bloomington.

Infelicities, of course, are mine.
David Ewick, April, 2004

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A Dream of Bric-a-Brac: The Nineteenth Century

Louisa Stuart Costello • Supposed to be Sung by the Wife of a Japanese Who Had Been Taken by the Russians to Their Country, 1825

Alexander Rodger • The Devil’s Visit to the Islands of Japan, 1838

C. H. W. • An Ode to the Japanese, 1860

Walt Whitman • The Errand-Bearers, 1860

Anonymous • Society in Japan, 1867

Horace Russell and William Greene • The Japanese Lovers, ca. 1870

Oliver Wendell Holmes • At the Banquet to the Japanese Embassy, 1872

R. H. Horne • Ode to the Mikado of Japan, 1873

Margaret Veley • A Japanese Fan, 1876

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow • from Kéramos, 1878

W. S. Gilbert • Two Songs from The Mikado, 1885

William Struthers • The Rejected Japanese Lover, 1887

W. E. Henley • Ballade of a Toyokuni Colour Print, 1888

John Hay • A Dream of Bric-a-Brac, 1890

Anonymous • The Japanese Doll, ca. 1890

Louis Belrose, Jr. • A Japanese Sword, 1891

Rudyard Kipling • Buddha at Kamakura, 1892

Edwin Arnold • Fuji-yama, 1892

Edwin Arnold • The Musmee, 1892

Oliver Herford • Japanesque, ca. 1893

. Ernest Fenollosa • Sonnet: Fuji at Sunrise, 1893 .

Mary McNeill Scott (Mary McNeill Fenollosa) • To a Portrait of a Japanese Princess, 1894

Mary Stockton Hunter • A Japanese Sword Song, 1895

Mrs. Merrill E. Gates • Japanese War Song, 1895

Mae St. John Bramhall • The Japanese “Good-Day,” 1897

Margaret A. Brooks • Japan, the Youngest Born, 1899

Aldis Dunbar • Japaneseque, 1900

Edgar Fawcett • The Yellow Danger, 1900

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Haunted in Old Japan: 1901~1909

And the Great Gate Swings: 1910~1919

What Was Hidden in Twilight Before: 1920~1929

The Heart of Standing: 1930~1939

The Thin Shell of Night: 1940~1949

The Aesthetic Point: 1950~1959

The Heart’s Garden: 1960~1969

Preparing the Past: 1970~1979

The Ache of Distance: 1980~1989

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Lost Objects: 1990~1999


Peter Robinson - Deep North (1993)

‘What silence
penetrating rock
the voice of the cicada’

Matsuo Bashô

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In Spaces Between East and West: 2000~



- source with hyperlinks : themargins.net/anth/19thc -

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. Introducing Japanese Haiku Poets .

- - - #poetsaboutjapan - - -
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24/05/2016

Kato Gosuke

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Kato Gosuke 加藤五輔
(1839 – 1905)
He comes from a family of ceramic artists, now in the 5th generation.



加藤五輔(一八三七-一九一五年)(1837 - 1915)
は名工として誉れ高く、多治見の市之倉にあった五輔の窯は、染め付けの細密画という、髪の毛よりも細い線を多用した絵付けを得意としていた。曲面をなす磁器の素地に描いていくのであるから、並大抵のことではないが、その絵をみると、動物も植物も、繊細な筆致によって生き生きとした表情に仕上がっている。

むろん海外での評価が高く、明治九(一八七六)年にフィラデルフィア万国博覧会に出品された作品は、現在、イギリス屈指の名門、ヴィクトリア・アンド・アルバート美術館に収蔵されている。また、同十一(一八七八)年のパリ万博では銅賞を受けて、その地位を確固たるものとした。当時はジャポニスムの全盛期であり、細やかな絵付けをみた欧米人たちの感嘆の声が聞こえてきそうである。
- reference : ss-info.com/contents/chunichi -


Mino ceramic artist from Gifu.



Mino ware, Japan made 1875

The glassy quality of the glaze and the vibrant hue of the blue found on this cup and saucer are typical of late nineteenth-century porcelains from Mino, which is located to the northeast of Nagoya in central Japan.
Kato Gosuke was a renowned painter of birds and flowers who went on to win several awards at the 1878 Paris Exposition Universelle. The cup and saucer were part of a group of over 200 ceramics bought on behalf of the V&A by the Japanese Exposition commissioners with funds provided by Philip Cunliffe-Owen, an ardent Japanophile who was director of the V&A from 1874 to 1893. The instructions sent to the commissioners were that they should ‘make an historical collection of porcelain and pottery from the earliest period until the present time, to be formed in such a way as to give fully the history of the art.’
- source : collections.vam.ac.uk -


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- - - - - His artwork at

- source : google search

- source : yahoo search

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- quote -
His artwork at Yahata Kumano Shrine Ichinokura
It’s not a big place, and very old, but it is quiet there and just a quick walk down the hill from our house. And like so many old Shinto shrines, it has its art treasures…but you have to look for them. In this case, the ceiling of a small, auxiliary building is where you can find the treasures…



treasures more than 150 years old, some by our local National Art Treasure, Kato Gosuke IV (1839–1905) and all by local artists who long ago lived in Ichinokura and who have passed on . All one has to do is walk up the time-worn wooden stairs and look up. Some of the paintings are so old that they have faded them almost beyond recognition, but if you look closely. . .








- source : Thanks to Aoi and Hayato on facebook -


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- Reference - 加藤五輔 -
- reference : Kato Gosuke mino -


. Gifu Folk Art - 岐阜県  .


. Introducing Japanese Haiku Poets .

- - - #katogosuke #gosukekato - - -
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14/04/2016

Chosokabe Motochika

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Choosokabe - Chōsokabe Motochika 長宗我部元親 Chosokabe Motochika
(1539 - 1599)



- quote
..... a Sengoku period daimyo in Japan.
He was the 21st chief of the Chōsokabe clan of Tosa Province (present-day Kōchi Prefecture). He was the son and heir of Chōsokabe Kunichika and his mother was a daughter of the Saitō clan of Mino Province.
In the 1562 Battle of Asakura 朝倉
Chosakabe Motochika defeated Motoyama Shigetoki and gained control of Shikoku Island. He then went on to take Aki Castle in the 1569 Siege of Aki.
In 1575,
Motochika was victorious at the Battle of Watarigawa 渡川, gaining control of Tosa Province. Over the ensuing decade, he extended his power to all of Shikoku. However, in 1585, Hashiba (later Toyotomi) Hideyoshi invaded that island with a force of 100,000 men, led by Ukita Hideie, Kobayakawa Takakage, Kikkawa Motonaga, Hashiba Hidenaga, and Hashiba Hidetsugu. Motochika surrendered, and forfeited Awa, Sanuki, and Iyo Provinces; Hideyoshi permitted him to retain Tosa.
Under Hideyoshi,
Motochika and his son Nobuchika participated in the invasion of neighboring Kyūshū, in which Nobuchika died. In 1590, Motochika led a fleet in the Siege of Odawara, and also fought in the Japanese invasions of Korea in 1592.
Motochika died in 1599
at age 61 at his mansion in Fushimi. His successor was Chōsokabe Morichika.
© More in the WIKIPEDIA !



- quote -
Daimyô of the Chosokabe family and eventual vassal to Toyotomi Hideyoshi, Motochika rose to rule Tosa and, for a short time, the whole of Shikoku. The Chosokabe were respected Jito (deputy administrators) of Tosa from the 12th century and entered the 16th Century as vassals of the Ichijô Clan, who were based in western Tosa.
- snip -
Unification of Shikoku
Following his conquest of Tosa, Motochika turned north and prepared for an invasion of Iyo. The lord of that province was Kôno Michinao, a daimyo who had once been driven from his domain by the Utsunomiya clan, returning only with the assistance of the powerful Môri. It was unlikely that Kôno could count on that sort of help again, however-presently the Môri were embroiled in a war with Oda Nobunaga. Nonetheless, Chosokabe's campaign in Iyo did not go off without a hitch. In 1579, a 7,000-man Chosokabe army, commanded by Hisatake Chikanobu, attacked the strongest fortress in Southern Iyo, Okayama castle, held by Doi Kiyoyoshi. During the ensuing siege of Okayama castle, Chikanobu was shot and killed by an arquebus and his army defeated, though the loss proved little more than an unfortunate delay. The next year, Motochika led some 30,000 men into Iyo, and forced Kôno to flee to Bungo province. With little interference from either the Môri or the Ôtomo, Chosokabe was free to press onwards, and in 1582 he stepped up ongoing raids into Awa and defeated the Sogo clan. By 1583, Chosokabe troops had subdued both Awa and Sanuki, making Motochika's dream of ruling all of Shikoku a reality.
Sometime around 1579,
Motochika entered into communication with Nobunaga, whom he fancied an ally. For his part, Nobunaga appears to have humored Motochika, though in private he referred to him as 'a bat on a birdless island' and planned to take Shikoku at some point (in fact naming his son Nobutada commander of the future invasion). This was averted by Nobunaga's death in 1582, and Motochika, whether he was aware of it or not, was given a new lease on life. By now he was something of a national power and became involved in the struggle between Toyotomi Hideyoshi and Tokugawa Ieyasu the following year. He promised the latter support, though made no direct moves to that end. Hideyoshi, to make sure, sent Sengoku Hidehisa (1551-1614) to block any efforts on Motochika's part, though these troops seem to have been roughly treated by the Lord of Shikoku upon arrival on the island. The so-called Komaki Campaign between Hideyoshi and Ieyasu ended in a peace treaty, which bode ill for Chosokabe.
In May 1584 Hideyoshi ordered a full-scale invasion of Shikoku, spear headed by 30,000 troops from the Môri clan and 60,000 more under Hashiba Hidenaga. Evidently, the late Nobunaga's assessment of the Chosokabe was accurate enough, for the invaders found a small army with such equipment as was available in poor condition. After desultory resistance, Motochika expressed a desire to negotiate. Hideyoshi's terms were generous. Motochika would get to keep his head and his hard-earned province of Tosa, an offer Motochika did not feel inclined to refuse.
- snip -
Leadership
In addition to his leadership, Motochika is remembered for his 100-Article Code of the Chosokabe and his struggle to found an economically strong castle town, moving in the course of his career from Oko to Otazaka and on to Urado.
- snip -
The Chosokabe were served by the Kosokabe, Kira (both of whom were led in Motochika's time by his brothers), Yoshida, Kumu, Kagawa (into which Motochika adopted a son, Chikakazu), Yumioka, and others.
- source : wiki.samurai-archives.com-

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Chōsokabe Nobuchika 長宗我部信親 Chosokabe Nobuchika
(1565 – January 1, 1587)
was the eldest son of samurai lord Chōsokabe Motochika, and lived during the late Sengoku Period of Japanese history. After the subjugation of Shikoku by Toyotomi Hideyoshi, Nobuchika and his father followed the Toyotomi into Kyushu. Nobuchika was caught in an ambush during the campaign against the Shimazu in Battle of Hetsugigawa 戸次川の戦い and died.
- reference source : -

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Chosokabe Nobuchika
Nobuchika was Chôsokabe Motochika's eldest and favorite son, and was popular with the Chôsokabe retainers owing to his warm and genial nature. His coming of age ceremony coincided with Motochika's communications with Oda Nobunaga, who provided the 'nobu' in Nobuchika's name, along with a sword and his ceremonial headgear. He was struck down in the retreat from the defeat at Hetsugigawa, on 1/20/1587.
The Shimazu honored Motochika by sending the body of his son to him and allowing him to flee to Shikoku. Nobuchika's death was lamented by the Chôsokabe, and especially Motochika, who had now to chose a successor. His decision to name Morichika as his heir would create deep rifts within the clan that contributed to its ultimate fall. - source : wiki.samurai-archives.com -

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. shichinin misaki 七人ミサキ "Misaki of seven people" .
a group of persons who died in an accident or in unnatural circumstances
- Introduction -

..... the most well-known is the ballad of the vengeful spirit of the Sengoku military commander of Tosa Province (now Kochi Prefecture), 吉良親実 Kira Chikazane, told about in classics like the "Rooho Kidan" (老圃奇談) and the "Shin'i Kaii Kidan" (神威怪異奇談).

- - - - - At 吉良神社 Kira Jinja
During the Azuchi–Momoyama period, after the death of the 長宗我部元親 Chōsokabe Nobuchika, the eldest son of Kira Chikazane's uncle Chōsokabe Motochika, since he opposed Motochika in supporting Chōsokabe Morichika as the successor, he was ordered to commit seppuku. At that time, several vassals also followed suicide (and thus 7 people in total), but afterwards, various strange events started happening at their graves, and the vengeful spirits of Chikazane and the rest were feared as the shichinin misaki. Motochika, who heard of this, held a memorial for them, but there was no effect, and in order to pacify the vengeful spirits, Kizuka Myojin (木塚明神) was deified at the gravesite of 西分村 Nishibun Village, 益井 Masui (now Kōchi). This is the currently existing Kira Shrine.

Also, according to the "Doyooiken Kidan" (土陽陰見奇談) and the 神威怪異奇談 "Shin'i Kaii Kidan," 比江山親興 Hieyama Chikaoki, who also opposed Motochika along with Chikazane, was also made to commit seppuku, and all 6 of his wife and children were also given the death penalty, and it is said that the total of 7 people became
the 比江村七人ミサキ Hie Village shichinin misaki.

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Kira Jinja 吉良神社 Kira Shrine
高知県高知市山ノ端町 - Kochi, Yamanohana
in the precincts of Shrine 若一王子宮.

Deity in residence is
Kira Chikazane 吉良親実
(1563 - 1598 ?1588)
a Chosokabe retainer

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Chikazane was a son of Kira Chikasada and a nephew of Chosokabe Motochika.
He was married to a cousin, the daughter of Chosokabe Motochika. He showed much promise from an early age but was hot-tempered and combative. In 1586 he protested the demands placed on him as part of the building of Toyotomi Hideyoshi's Great Buddha (which called for lumber from Tosa).
When Chosokabe Nobuchika was killed (1587), Motochika named his 4th son Chosokabe Morichika as his heir. Chikazane protested this decision and demanded that Kagawa Chikazane be chosen instead. He had by this time made enemies with Hisatake Chikanao, a leading Chosokabe retainer, and this most probably worked against him. Motochika responded to his vocal complaints by having him placed under confinement.
Chikazane was then ordered to commit suicide.
- source : wiki.samurai-archives.com -

Kubiarai hachi 首洗い鉢 basin for washing the head
of Chikazane, who committed suicide and his seven retainers followed him.
- See the story above.




- reference : japanmystery.com/koti -

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Ukita Hideie 宇喜多秀家
(1573 – December 17, 1655)
was the daimyo of Bizen and Mimasaka provinces (modern Okayama Prefecture), and one of the council of Five Elders appointed by Toyotomi Hideyoshi. Son of Ukita Naoie, he married Gōhime, a daughter of Maeda Toshiie, but Hideyoshi's adopted daughter.
Having fought against Tokugawa Ieyasu in the Battle of Sekigahara he was exiled to the island prison of Hachijōjima, where he died.
- - - More in the WIKIPEDIA !

Hideie and 豪姫 Gohime were a loving couple.
To have something nice for his wife he had a sweet Sake made in Kojima (Kurashiki).
備前児島酒 Bizen Kojima Sake

- reference : msb.co.jp/product -

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. Legends and Tales from Japan 伝説 - Introduction .

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Ehime 東宇和郡

Kappa 河童 and Utsunomiya Masatsuna 宇都宮正綱

. Utsunomiya Masatsuna and Kappa at Wakamiya Jinja .
Wakamiya Jinja 若宮神社 - The shrine is dedicated to Masatsuna (1447 - 1477).

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ike harete yamamizu samushi yuki no kage

Soogi, Sogi (Sōgi Jinensai hokku 1519)
Utsunomiya Masatsuna: head of the Utsunomiya house, based in the city of that name in Shimotsuke Province (modernday Tochigi Prefecture) ...

Come summer, pond water will be stagnant and murky, but a fresh infusion of snowmelt from the mountains makes it clear enough to reflect snow of the peaks.

Haiku Before Haiku: From the Renga Masters to Basho
By Steven D. Carter
- source : books.google.co.jp -


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Kagawa 香川県 三豊郡 詫間町

shirikiri uma しりきり馬
choonaisan チョウナイサン, a five-tired stone monoumet
a man called Akiyama Chonai 秋山チョウナイという人物
チョウナイサンという五輪が祀られている。これは元亀・元正の頃に長宗我部元親に追われた秋山チョウナイという人物が土着した。その屋敷跡に祠を祀ったものである。今でもチョウナイが乗ってきたしりきり馬が夜に歩き回るという。
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チョウナイサンという五輪が祀られている。これは元亀・元正の頃に長宗我部元親に追われた秋山チョウナイという人物が土着した。その屋敷跡に祠を祀ったものである。昔、法事のときに膳椀が無いのでこれにお願いした、すると、翌日には揃っていたという。


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Kochi 高知県 幡多郡 大月町

When the eldest son of 長宗我部元親 Chōsokabe Nobuchika was killed in the war against the Shimazu clan 島津征伐, his second and third son begun to fight for the right to the family head (which was usually the eldest son). The second son and seven of his followers got killed. These seven could not go to heaven and became a storm, later to be venerated as Seven Misaki.

. shichinin misaki 七人ミサキ "Misaki of seven people" .

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- reference : nichibun yokai database -

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- Reference - 長宗我部元親 -
- Reference - Chosokabe Motochika -


. Introducing Japanese Haiku Poets .

- - - #chosokabenobuchika #nobuchika - - -
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30/03/2016

Ashikaga Takauji and Godaigo

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Ashikaga Takauji 足利尊氏
(1305 – 1358)



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Ashikaga Takauji   足利尊氏
(1305 – June 7, 1358) was the founder and first shogun of the Ashikaga shogunate. His rule began in 1338, beginning the Muromachi period of Japan, and ended with his death in 1358. He was a descendant of the samurai of the (Minamoto) Seiwa Genji line (meaning they were descendants of Emperor Seiwa) who had settled in the Ashikaga area of Shimotsuke Province, in present day Tochigi Prefecture.

According to famous Zen master and intellectual Musō Soseki, who enjoyed his favor and collaborated with him, Takauji had three qualities.
- First, he kept his cool in battle and was not afraid of death.
- Second, he was merciful and tolerant.
- Third, he was very generous with those below him.

Takauji was a general of the Kamakura shogunate sent to Kyoto in 1333 to put down the Genkō War which had started in 1331.
After becoming increasingly disillusioned with the Kamakura shogunate over time, Takauji joined the banished Emperor GoDaigo II and Kusunoki Masashige, and seized Kyoto. Soon after, Nitta Yoshisada joined their cause, and laid siege to Kamakura. When the city fell to Nitta, the Shogunal regent, Hōjō Takatoki, and his clansmen committed suicide. This ended the Kamakura shogunate, as well as the Hōjō clan's power and influence.
GoDaigo was enthroned once more as emperor, reestablishing the primacy of the Imperial court in Kyoto and starting the so-called Kenmu Restoration.
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At the decisive Battle of Minatogawa in 1336, Takauji defeated Yoshisada again and killed Masashige, allowing him to seize Kyoto for good. Emperor Kōmyō of the illegitimate Northern Court (see below) was installed as emperor by Takauji in opposition to the exiled Southern Court, beginning the turbulent Northern and Southern Court period (Nanboku-chō), which saw two emperors fight each other and which would last for almost 60 more years.
Besides other honors,
Emperor GoDaigo II had given Takauji the title of Chinjufu Shogun 鎮守府将軍, or Commander-in-chief of the Defense of the North, and the courtly title of the Fourth Rank, Junior Grade.
- - - More in the WIKIPEDIA !

- - - - - His jisei 辞世 last poem

良し悪しと 人をば言ひて たれもみな わが心をや 知らぬならん

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南北朝の動乱を生きぬいた武将
柳川 創造 古城 武司

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Emperor Go-Daigo, Godaigo (後醍醐天皇 Go-Daigo-tennō)
(November 26, 1288 – September 19, 1339) was the 96th emperor of Japan.
..... In 1333, Emperor Go-Daigo escaped from Oki with the help of Nawa Nagatoshi and his family, raising an army at Funagami Mountain in Hōki Province (the modern town of Kotoura in Tōhaku District, Tottori Prefecture). Ashikaga Takauji, who had been sent by the shogunate to find and destroy this army, sided with the emperor and captured the Rokuhara Tandai. .....
..... When Ashikaga's army entered Kyōto, Emperor Go-Daigo resisted, fleeing to Mount Hiei, but seeking reconciliation, he sent the imperial regalia to the Ashikaga side. Takauji enthroned the Jimyōin-tō emperor, Kōmyō, and officially began his shogunate with the enactment of the Kenmu Law Code ... Go-Daigo escaped from the capital in Jan. 1337, the regalia that he had handed over to the Ashikaga being counterfeit, and set up the Southern Court among the mountains of Yoshino, beginning the Period of Northern and Southern Courts in which the Northern Dynasty in Kyōto and the Southern Dynasty in Yoshino faced off against each other.
- - - More in the WIKIPEDIA !


. Kasagidera 笠置寺 Kasagi-Dera in Kyoto .
On August 27th in Genkou 1 ( the 1st year of Genkou, in 1331 ), Emperor Go Daigo 後醍醐天皇, who attempted to usurp power from the Kamakura shougunate but failed, escaped into Kasagi Dera. For about a month, these was a battle between Emperor Go Daigo and the Kamakura shougunate (Kasagiyama no Tatakai 笠置山の戦い Siege of Mount Kasagiyama). At the end, Emperor Go Daigo lost and retreated to Yoshino Yama. Only the burnt ruins of Kasagi Dera remained.

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Tōji-In 等持院 Toji-In
dedicated to Ashikaga Takauji
and a Daruma



Reikō-den 霊光殿 and the famous
riun Jizo bosatsu, ri-un 利運地蔵菩薩
Jizo to win in battle
. Jizo Bosatsu (Kshitigarbha) 地蔵菩薩 .

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. Ashikaga Yoshimitsu 足利 義満 (1358 - 1408).
The third Ashikaga Shogun and the Higashiyama Culture in Kyoto

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Fudo Myo-O on the breast plate of the armour of Ashikaga Takauji
. yoroi Fudoo 鎧不動 Fudo Myo-O and armour .


. basara ばさら / 婆娑羅 / バサラ flamboyant elegance .
..... Basara activities were banned in the Kenmu Code, which was the fundamental code of laws for the shogunate established by Takauji Ashikaga in 1336.

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佐藤和彦 - 足利尊氏

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A homepage for Ashikaga Takauji

このホームページは教育現場からのご利用に配慮しております。
- source : www.ashikagatakauji.jp -

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- - - - - H A I K U - - - - -


. Matsuo Basho in Kanegasaki, Tsuruga .
The mystery background story
of the war bell at the bottom of the sea

..... The castle Kanegasakijoo 金崎城 / 鐘ヶ崎城 is the place where Nitta Yoshisada (1301 - 1338) fought against Ashikaga Takauji 足利尊氏 (1305 - 1358), who was trying to topple the government.

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尊氏の爪墓に啼く法師蝉
Takauji no tsumebaka ni naku hooshizemi

at the grave of
the nails of Takauji
a monk cicada is singing


西岡史代 Nishioka Fumiyo



This grave for his nails 尊氏の爪墓 is at the temple 安楽寺 Anraku-Ji, Nagahama, which was constructed on Takauji's orders at the time of his death.
- source : ameblo.jp/lani-lani-aroma-



CLICK for more photos !

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尊氏の血の流れゐる昼寝かな
龍岡晋 Tatsuoka Shin (1904 - 1983)


年酒一盞尊氏と酌む陣揃ひ
田中水桜 Tanaka Suioo

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This famous portrait is most probably not Takauji himself, but his brother Tadayoshi 足利直義.

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. Legends and Tales from Japan 伝説 - Introduction .

gunjin kago 軍神加護 divine protection by the God of War
Takauji tried everything to win a battle. Before he had to fight 楠木正成 Kusunoki Masashige and 新田義貞 Nitta Yoshisada he prayed at the Munakata Shrine in Buzen (now Fukuoka) and asked for winning.
Nitta was a great general too, but he lost because he did not make offerings to a deity.


His problemwith Godaigo Tenno 後醍醐天皇
After he fought Godaigo Tenno and founded the 足利幕府 Ashikaga Bakufu government, there were many rumous that the vengeful spirit of Godaigo would now cause trouble for the land. Since the spirit could not be consoled by a human, Takauji had the temple 天龍寺 Tenryu-Ji offer prayers for the sould and finally things calmed down.
『太平記』巻25「天龍寺事」 - as written in the Taiheiki, Volume 25.


His relation with the Tengu 天狗
天狗の階級、種類、名前、登場する記録を列挙。南北朝時代には天狗評定、天狗集会で天下の動乱を画策し、足利尊氏一族に内紛が起きたという。(太平記に記載)


yahiroi Jizo 矢拾いの地蔵 Jizo to pick up the arrows
“Shōgun Ashikaga Takauji 足利 尊氏, a fervent Jizō devotee, drew a picture of Jizō and worshipped it daily."
"Jōkōmyōji Temple 浄光明寺 in Kamakura houses a statue of Jizō called the Yahiroi Jizō 矢拾い地蔵, literally Arrow-Gathering Jizō. According to legend, Yahiroi Jizō appeared as a child-monk on the battlefield to save Ashikaga Tadayoshi 足利直義 (1306-52), the younger brother of Ashikaga Takauji, by gathering arrows after Tadayoshi had run out of weapons."
. Shogun Jizo 勝軍地蔵 Victorious Jizo .

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- reference : nichibun yokai database -


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Kabuki - Shinrei Yaguchi no Watashi
The play "Shinrei Yaguchi no Watashi" was originally written for the puppet theater (Bunraku) and staged in the 1st lunar month of 1770 in Edo at the Gekiza. It was adapted to Kabuki many years later and staged for the first time in the 8th lunar month of 1794 at the Kiriza.



- Summary
During the reign of the Emperor Godaigo, the wicked Ashikaga Takauji attempted to dethrone the Emperor and set up a pretender in his place. A great battle was fought on the Plain of Musashino, near what later became Edo. The commander of the Imperial army was Nitta Yoshioki, a famous soldier. He and his troops fought courageously, but were defeated through the treachery of a man whom Yoshioki believed to be his friend. Yoshioki himself was murdered by this same false friend at Yaguchi, where a ferry crossed the Tama River.
- source : www.kabuki21.com/yaguchi_no_watashi -


. 新田義貞 Nitta Yoshisada (1301 - 1338) .

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- Reference - 足利尊氏 -
- Reference - English -

- - - #ashikagatakauji #takauji #godaigo - - -
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Takauji 尊氏せんべい Senbei rice crackers




Takauji monaka 最中 waffles with his kao 花押 signature 



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